Bill Gates and Steve Jobs knew about the dangers of smartphones and social media

Business Insider released an article that acknowledges the “anti-social media” phenomenon I’ve been writing about for years.

Most keen technologists, including Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, recognize the social and societal detriment caused by social media. When social media is combined with take-it-anywhere smartphone technolo… Read more

All of modern society’s ills packaged into one story: Apple iPhone X, social media and unbridled narcissism

“Viral” may be the most apt term derived from the modern technological era. Not only does it describe a negative phenomenon that spreads quickly (primarily via social media, the carrier), it infects the minds of all the users (the hosts).

A recent story broke out that encapsulates everything that is wrong with today’s modern society.

T… Read more

The Chapwood Index: why government released inflation data is fake

My last article discussed how Keynesian economic theory is used as a persuasion tool for current institutions of power to gain even more power. One of the keys to hide the destructiveness of Keynesian theory is to lie about inflation. Manufactured inflation numbers pose as “scientific data” to justify economic policy and interest rate decis… Read more

Keynesian economics is one big persuasion tactic to grow the government and central banks

Like the postmodern movement, the rise of Keynesian theory in academia in the past century has led to government institutions wielding more power than they merit. The general public doesn’t really understand this recent interpretation of economics, so they are encouraged to trust a group of economic “experts” to sort it out for them.… Read more

FANG(+T) tech bubble: Twitter loses less money than it thought, jumps 10% pre-market

On Thursday, Twitter reported a third-quarter loss of $21 million, or 3 cents per share. Excluding one-time items, the company earned 10 cents per share in the latest quarter.

The results exceeded Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 12 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of 6 cents per share.

The company posted re

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Toronto housing bubble: inflation or deflation — pick your poison

A new Ipsos poll came out that shows Canadians are pretty much screwed no matter what the next Keynesian move is by the Bank of Canada:

Four in ten (43%) say they are concerned about the impact of rising interest rates on their financial situation, and nearly three in ten (28%) expressed concern that rising interest rates could move them towards bankruptcy.


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Toronto housing bubble: personal debt treadmill at maximum speed

Take a look at this screen grab of the real estate headlines at (Canadian Propaganda 24 hours a day):

RBC says housing affordability measure worst since 1990. Toronto hits worst level ever; Toronto-area housing prices may already near bottom: RBC economist

Affordability is the worst, yet prices are near the bottom?

Nothing is technically “affordable” nowadays in a Keynesian powered economy. No one is encouraged to save, and everyone (government included) relies on debt, a.k.a. future … Read more

Wired article almost admits how it gets brainwashed by social media

Following my latest four-part series on social media’s psychologically damaging effects, Wired’s Jesse Hempel coincidentally releases an article about the problems with social media. It is a rare moment of self-reflection. It almost recognizes the root problem but just doesn’t quite get there.

One of the conclusions of the… Read more

“Our minds can be hijacked” Part 4: the death of nuance and humility

This article follows Parts 12 and 3 of a four part commentary on The Guardian’s article “Our minds can be hijacked”.

Narcissism is in, humility is out. Social media and the coddled generation have cultivated a culture of blaming others for their own failings and perceived injustices.

Politics is downstream from culture. Politics has taken o… Read more

“Our minds can be hijacked” Part 3: to regulate or not to regulate?

This article follows Parts 1 and 2 of a four part commentary on The Guardian’s article “Our minds can be hijacked”.

The widespread negative social ramifications of smart phones and social media gives way to the question: to regulate or not to regulate? Should we trust people with weaponized legislation to be moral arbiters?

The inven… Read more