Fake News Calculator

To what degree is a YouTube channel espousing fake news?

Generally speaking, when a video contains false or highly disputed information, it cannot withstand public scrutiny. To save face, the uploader will either disable the comments section or only allow approved comments.

A somewhat reliable indicator of “fake news” is the number of vide… Read more

CBC’s The National has something to hide

Following up from yesterday’s blog post: if news outlets from big media are the supposed purveyors of truth, then what do they have to hide by disabling their comments section in their YouTube videos?

The truth should be able to stand up on its own in an open marketplace of ideas.

CBC’s The National managed to shut down the comments sections on mos… Read more

Does CP24 stand for Canadian Propaganda 24 hours a day?

Legacy media in collusion with Canadian government (federal, provincial and municipal) is tripling down on its efforts in Canada to control “mainstream” opinion.  In an article released by the Canadian Press, the brainwashing must begin from youth lest children discover that there are multiple sides of a story, usually found on the Inter… Read more

Exploiting the “big data” monopoly: YouTube, Google and Facebook are vulnerable in ways small startups are not

“Big data” is a relatively new domain in software. Programming languages such as Python and R have sharply risen in popularity as they specialize in statistical analysis of large data sets.  Fluency in these languages is a requirement for aspiring employees of Alphabet (YouTube/Google) and Facebook.

“Big data” only exist… Read more

Former Google software engineer James Damore points out the politicization of big tech companies

James Damore is a former Google (parent company Alphabet) software engineer that was fired for sharing his thoughts on discriminatory hiring practices within the company and his suggestions on how to better attract diverse talent.

To prepare for a series of upcoming blog posts on how big tech and social media firms are becoming increasingly detrimental t… Read more

Complexity doesn’t sell — “you don’t understand cryptocurrencies” is not an argument

Saying “you just don’t get it” is a persuasion tactic normally held by stakeholders trying to make the sale. It implies that skeptics are too dumb to understand. It persuades people to side with the cool kids so that they can hurl the same arrogant insult to other naysayers. BitCoin and cryptocurrency holders are supposedly brilliant fo… Read more

Central banks, big media and big corp show off their market manipulation skills: BitCoin drops 30% off its highs in past 30 days

In my two previous articles There’s no use arguing BitCoin versus gold and When non-tech savvy people talk about BitCoin, is it a sign of a bubble at its peak? I asserted that BitCoin behaves like a commodity, like gold, and public psychology ultimately determines its value. If the public perceives it as worthless, its value will drop to zero.

A main t… Read more

The hidden cost of Facebook, Google and other “free” services

In yesterday’s post about the Equifax hack, I referenced a video by Computing Forever that describes the technocratic dystopia where the information users voluntarily put in to “free” online services like Facebook is nefariously being used against the users.

Facebook and Google own a large market share of the Internet user base beca… Read more

Facebook is self-inflicted identify theft, now made easier with the Equifax hack

For the first time in my life I received a call from scammers posing as Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The call originated from a newly released area code — an immediate sign of a fake. In case they contacted you too, the number is 289-855-2982. The caller’s voice was a text-to-speech engine — another sign of a fake. The impostors were trying to hide the… Read more

Paul Krugman and Keynesian theory got one thing right about hurricane Irma, but it’s not what you think

To paraphrase a Louis CK comedy bit, let’s assume you were a billionaire. You decide to buy all the pants in the world, and then just burn them. Does this have a positive impact on the economy?

Let’s assume you spent $1 billion to buy all the pants. This represents $1 billion of savings, or stated differently, $1 billion in goods and services produc… Read more